10 weird houses you never knew existed

Its interesting to know that nothing is actually impossible. Even when you read the bible and it says “with God nothing is impossible” many if us still doubt if that’s true. When you see these houses am about to show you, you’ll begin to believe more in the sovereignty of your maker.

Do enjoy;

The upside down house in Poland

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The upside down house

The house was created by Daniel Czapiewski to describe the former communist era and the present times in which we live. 

Toilet shaped house in Suwon, South Korea

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Toilet house

South Korean sanitation activists marked the start of a global toilet association right here on November 21, 2007, by lifting the lid on the world’s first lavatory-shaped home that offers plenty of water closet space. 

Shoe house in Pennysylvania

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Shoe house

It was an actual guesthouse (3 bedroom, 2 baths, a kitchen and a living room) of a local shoe magnate, Mahlon N. Haines. After his death, it was an ice cream parlor for a while, and now it is a museum. 

Boeing 727 house in Mississippi, USA

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Boeing house

The plane set Joanne Ussary back $2,000.00, cost $4,000.00 to move, and $24,000.00 to renovate. The stairs open with a garage door remote, and one of the bathrooms is still intact. And let’s not forget the personal jacuzzi in the cockpit. 

Teapot Dome, WA, USA

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Teapot house

It was built in 1922 as a reminder of the Teapot Dome Scandal involving President Warren G. Harding and a federal petroleum reserve in Wyoming. 

Nautilus house, Mexico

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Nautilus house

It is a seashell-inspired abode built by designed by Senosiain Arquitectos for a couple. 

Bubble house, Cannes, France

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Bubble house

In the early eighties, fashion designer Pierre Cardin bought this atypical summer house built by architect Antti Lovag. 

Log house, California, USA

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Log house

It is a one-bedroom house hollowed out from a single log that came from a 2,100-year old redwood tree. After felling this 13 foot diameter forest giant, Art Schmock and a helper needed 8 months of hard labor to hollow out the log into a room 7 ft. high and 32 ft. long, weighing about 42 tons. 

Credit: 1

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